~ Plan Ahead for Passover ~

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he Jewish holiday of Passover commemorates the Israelites exodus from slavery in Egypt and celebrates their liberation while recognizing their hardships.This holiday is celebrated for eight days and is marked by a variety of traditions and rituals, including the consumption of specific Passover foods. These foods are a reflection of the cultural and historical significance of the holiday and are enjoyed by Jewish families around the world.

One of the most iconic Passover foods is matzo, also known as unleavened bread. Matzo is a staple of the Passover diet and is used in a variety of dishes, including matzo ball soup, matzo brei (a matzo-based pancake), and matzo pizza. Brisket is another Passover favorite. This slow-cooked beef dish is typically seasoned with garlic, onions, and other herbs and spices and is served with vegetables such as carrots and potatoes. Brisket is a hearty and flavorful dish that is perfect for large family gatherings during the holiday.

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he Jewish holiday of Passover commemorates the Israelites exodus from slavery in Egypt and celebrates their liberation while recognizing their hardships.This holiday is celebrated for eight days and is marked by a variety of traditions and rituals, including the consumption of specific Passover foods. These foods are a reflection of the cultural and historical significance of the holiday and are enjoyed by Jewish families around the world.

One of the most iconic Passover foods is matzo, also known as unleavened bread. Matzo is a staple of the Passover diet and is used in a variety of dishes, including matzo ball soup, matzo brei (a matzo-based pancake), and matzo pizza. Brisket is another Passover favorite. This slow-cooked beef dish is typically seasoned with garlic, onions, and other herbs and spices and is served with vegetables such as carrots and potatoes. Brisket is a hearty and flavorful dish that is perfect for large family gatherings during the holiday.

Another popular Passover food is gefilte fish. This traditional dish is made from a mixture of ground fish (usually carp, pike, or whitefish) and other ingredients such as onions, carrots, and matzo meal. The mixture is then formed into balls or patties and cooked in a fish stock. Gefilte fish is often served cold as an appetizer and is a staple of Passover meals.

Charoset is a sweet Passover dish that is made from chopped nuts, apples, cinnamon, and wine. Charoset is typically served on a piece of matzo and is a delicious and meaningful addition to any Passover meal. For dessert, many Jewish families enjoy matzo meal-based treats such as macaroons and sponge cakes. These sweet treats are a great way to end a Passover meal and are often served with coffee or tea.

Passover is a holiday that is marked by a variety of traditional foods that are rich in cultural and historical significance. From matzo to brisket to charoset, these foods are a reflection of the Jewish people’s connection to their history and their faith. Whether enjoyed with family or shared with friends, Passover foods are a delicious and meaningful way to celebrate this special holiday.

Passover Brisket ~ Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4-5 lb beef brisket, trimmed of excess fat
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Season the brisket generously with salt and pepper.
  3. Add a drizzle of olive oil to the skillet, and sear the brisket on both sides until browned, about 5-6 minutes per side. Remove the brisket from the skillet and set aside.
  4. Add the sliced onions and minced garlic to the skillet, and sauté until the onions are soft and translucent, about 5-7 minutes.
  5. In a separate bowl, whisk together the beef broth, red wine, tomato paste, honey, Dijon mustard, thyme, and rosemary.
  6. Transfer the sautéed onions and garlic to a large roasting pan. Place the seared brisket on top of the onions.
  7. Pour the broth and wine mixture over the brisket.
  8. Cover the roasting pan tightly with foil, and bake for 3-4 hours, or until the brisket is fork-tender.
  9. Remove the foil, and continue baking for an additional 15-20 minutes to brown the top of the brisket.
  10. Let the brisket rest for 10-15 minutes before slicing. Serve with the onion and pan juices.
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